The Manufacturer’s Apprentice

Manufacturing Apprentice Programs

With the manufacturing skills gap being a topic that is on all of our minds, one of the tactics being used to address the issue is a time-tested tradition. The position of the manufacturing apprentice, as well as apprentice positions for other industrial jobs like electricians, technicians, and similar jobs, is an excellent option for both job seekers and those in the industry who need skilled workers.

manufacturing apprenticeWhat exactly is an apprentice? The Department of Labor defines an apprentice as a position that “combines on-the-job training with job-related instruction…a “learn while you earn” model – apprentices receive a paycheck from the first day and progressive increases in wages as their skills advance.”

Basically, if you want to be an apprentice, you want to be paid to learn how to do your job. This is preferential to those who know what they want to do for a career. They don’t want to spend two to four years while paying to get a degree somewhere that is not specific to the niche industrial areas that have an urgent need of employees. It’s a win-win.

Here are the three things people seeking an apprenticeship in this job field will need to know to get started:

First, you need to evaluate what area you would want to work in. CareerOneStop, which is a site sponsored by the Department of Labor, will help you build a skills profile. By looking into traits such as your social skills, listening skills, speaking skills, problem-solving skills, technical skills, computer skills, and more, it will give you a list of possible jobs that would suit you. If any of the careers listed are remotely industrial, technical or relative to manufacturing, an apprenticeship would be a good option.

Secondly, you need a starting point, which would be this resource page via the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA). Here, you will find resources like workshops and apprenticeship listings to take advantage of. The Department of Labor even has special resources for women who want these higher-paying, but unconventional jobs, under the Pre-Apprenticeship Program.

Finally, pick the apprenticeship for you. Once you enter one of these programs, the length of the program and rate of pay will vary. An apprenticeship can be anywhere from one to six years long. There are even informal apprentice positions private companies offer when you look them up on job sites like Indeed.com

Do you already work in the manufacturing industry and need better productivity on your shop floor? Call Shop Floor Automations at (877) 611-5825 or interact with us on social media